Last Week, IBM Traced 28 Tons of Oranges Using Blockchain. Also Last Week, Sourcemap Traced 1,000 Tons of Cocoa - No Blockchain Required.

The First Step to Traceability: Stenciling Batch Numbers on Bags of Cocoa at a Depot in Ghana

The First Step to Traceability: Stenciling Batch Numbers on Bags of Cocoa at a Depot in Ghana

There’s a lot of hype around using blockchain to trace supply chains. How does it stand up in the real world? The most widely publicized blockchain pilots involve shippers and retailers - the ‘last leg’ of a global supply chain. What happens when you want to trace a product from the source, and that source is halfway around the world?

Global supply chains include people from every walk of life, from smallholder farmers to corporate executives. The challenge with traceability is finding a solution that can handle the complexity of global trade while being easy to adopt each step of the way. Sourcemap uses proven technology, including the graph databases that power social networks and mobile apps that work on the most common devices. And of course, spreadsheets.

You can trust the data. Everything that’s uploaded to Sourcemap is encrypted and changes are tracked, so there is no chance of someone altering a record without being detected. And the app is lightweight, so it’s used to capture lots of additional data: farm areas, workforce statistics, indicators for safety and hygiene. You can rest assured, not only that the source of products is authentic, but also that important risks such as child labor and deforestation are minimized.

Traceability isn’t about blockchain, it’s about digitizing the supply chain. Once paper- and spreadsheet-based records are uploaded to the cloud, the savings are immense: no more document handling, better quality control, fewer delays and disruptions, less risk. To learn more about the agile ways that end-to-end traceability is being implemented in supply chains around the world, get in touch. We’d love to hear from you.

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