Supply Chain Transparency

Texworld USA Transparency and Traceability Panel - What we learned.

Panelists from left to right: Maggie Kervick (GCNYC Director of Strategy & Integrated Partnerships), Juliette Barre (Director of Business Development and Marketing, Sourcemap), Leslie Ferrick (Senior Manager of Fabric R&D/Sourcing Dept., Athleta), Karen Newman (United Nations Consultant), and Louise Claughton (Senior Director, PVH Corp.)

Panelists from left to right: Maggie Kervick (GCNYC Director of Strategy & Integrated Partnerships), Juliette Barre (Director of Business Development and Marketing, Sourcemap), Leslie Ferrick (Senior Manager of Fabric R&D/Sourcing Dept., Athleta), Karen Newman (United Nations Consultant), and Louise Claughton (Senior Director, PVH Corp.)

Customers and investors are looking for answers: they want brands to provide data about where products come from, how they are made, and other key sustainability facts. It sounds simple, but supply chains can be complex in the age of international trade and a single item can be made of materials from hundreds of suppliers. 

This week Sourcemap was at Texworld USA to meet and discuss with textile brands and manufacturers. Our Director of Business Development and Marketing, Juliette Barre participated in the panel: Transparency and Traceability, Challenges Facing Major Brands. Juliette joined moderator Maggie Kervick (GCNYC Director of Strategy & Integrated Partnerships) with panelists Karen Newman (United Nations Consultant), Leslie Ferrick (Senior Manager of Fabric R&D/Sourcing Dept., Athleta), and Louise Claughton (Senior Director, PVH Corp.).

Some key takeaways from the panel: 

  • Understanding your supply chain from end-to-end benefits a brand’s bottom line:

    • Companies can better anticipate and adapt to disruptions when they know who is in their supply chain

    • Marketing departments can use transparency to back up commitments and avoid greenwashing

    • Suppliers are partners; understanding where they are and opening dialogue around transparency strengthens business relationships

    • Investor increasingly care about the supply chains of their portfolio companies - after all, it’s their supply chain too

  • There’s no need to reinvent the wheel: use open-source resources to gather information on what other industry peers or goal-oriented groups are doing to tackle a specific objective. The UN’s Sustainable Development Goals act as a framework, detailing what issues and targets can be achieved in specific areas.

  • If your brand isn’t doing anything about transparency, get started:

    • Don’t be afraid to communicate the good things your company is doing - if you don’t share, you won’t get the credit

    • Be transparent about where you need to improve. No one expects companies to be perfect. Acknowledging gaps and communicating on your action plan will help avoid backlash from third-party organizations. 

The discussion highlighted many ways in which sustainability and traceability can drive operating efficiency. By exploring the supply chain and problems/opportunities within, business functions can be more efficiently used to tackle important issues. But all of the panelists agreed that the journey to sustainability is not linear or clear-cut, it is full of trial, error, reflection, and action. 

The Responsible Mica Initiative Gets Serious About Supply Chain Mapping [Interview]

Source: Reuters 2016

Source: Reuters 2016

Sourcemap’s mission is to map the world’s supply chains, and as part of that mission, we engage with leading practitioners of supply chain transparency to bring attention to their issues and approaches. We start this series with Fanny Fremont, Executive Director of the Responsible Mica Initiative (RMI). RMI is a non-profit organization committed to establishing a fair, responsible and sustainable mica supply chain in the states of Jharkhand and Bihar in India that will eliminate unacceptable working conditions and eradicate child labour by 2022. RMI currently has 55 members including companies like L’Oreal, Merck, Shiseido, Coty, BASF, LVMH, PPG and many more.

Mica has rightfully earned the nickname ‘nature’s glitter’ because it’s a natural mineral used to add sparkle to everything including paints, furniture, automobiles, plastic, electronics, and cosmetics, among others. Despite the mineral’s gleaming properties, the dark side of Mica begins at the source. As much as 25%(*) of the world’s mica is extracted from informal mines in India where working conditions are harsh and systemic problems endure, including child labor. Sourcemap’s Director of Business Development Juliette Barre sat down with Fanny to shine some light on the issues facing the mica supply chain.
 

JB: Can you tell me how the Responsible Mica Initiative came about?

FF: The RMI was officially created in January 2017, building on several existing individual initiatives regarding mica mining in India, with the ambition of aligning the efforts of all the stakeholders, building common standards and programs and scaling up impact from the mines to the end-users. The RMI uses a multi-stakeholder and holistic approach that engages companies, civil society organizations, industry associations, and governments to develop and implement three integrated program pillars that will establish responsible workplace standards, empower local communities and establish a legal framework for the mica sector. That’s to us the only way to leverage a positive impact on local communities, children and their environment, and to drive a long-lasting change.

JB: Issues around Mica aren't new, but lately we’ve been hearing more about them in the news. Why do you think that is?

FF: I guess it’s a combination of growing public awareness versus issues linked to mica sourcing and request for increased transparency; of development of hard and soft regulations focusing on respect of human rights within supply chains - including of minerals supply chains; and - I hope - of our efforts as Responsible Mica Initiative to raise awareness and federate different stakeholders around our mission and activities.

JB: Based on your experience and work with your members, what do you think are the three biggest challenges regarding Mica traceability at the moment?

FF: The 3 main challenges we are facing are (i) the mapping as a pre-requisite, (ii) the lack of clear legal framework regarding mica collection in India, and (iii) the cost. For mica-using industries like automotive or electronics, components using mica can be numerous and supply chains complex. Finding out who are the exact tiers 1, 2, 3… suppliers till the mica mines is already a challenge. Then, to date, feedback from the field indicated that no single mine in Jharkhand and in Bihar (India) can be considered legal, meaning with a valid government license. Based on this, our assumption is that it would be very complicated to have very upstream actors entering identification and volume information into a shared tool. And finally, mica is a low-value mineral in comparison to gold or even other minerals. Bearing the costs of new traceability technologies could represent a barrier to some actors if the ROI is unclear.

JB: What are the frameworks and/or best practices available to the private sector at the moment?

FF: Right after its creation in January 2017, the RMI started work to develop responsible workplace standards which provide a central resource for preventing child labor and improving overall working conditions at mica processors and mines in India. Workplace standards address five dimensions of operations at mines and processors: legal requirements, social obligations, Occupational Health & Safety (OHS) provisions, economic requirements, and environmental standards. To my knowledge, there is no other equivalent standard focusing on mica.

JB: What first step(s) should any company using mica start implementing?

FF: The first step would be to map their mica uses, and right after that, take action. Risks linked to mica sourcing and processing activities have already been identified and assessed, and there is an urgent need for action. We are talking about the worst forms of child labor and globally harsh working conditions. I would, of course, encourage joining forces with the Responsible Mica Initiative through active membership.

More information about RMI can be found at their website: https://www.responsible-mica-initiative.com/

For information about tracing mica in your supply chain, find out how Sourcemap can help: https://www.sourcemap.com/traceability-1

References:

(*) https://www.responsible-mica-initiative.com/the-mica-issue.html

https://www.somo.nl/beauty-and-a-beast/ 


 

Evolving Tech for Supply Chain Transparency [Sustainable Brands 2019 Panel]

Vans on Sourcemap

Last week I had the pleasure of participating in Sustainable Brands 2019 as part of the panel moderated by Mia Overall of Overall Strategies, and with Pete Girard of Toxnot, Tara O'Shea of Planet, David Potere of Indigo and Jamie Tomkins of Oritain. Altogether the panel provided cutting-edge insight into the future of supply chain transparency powered by technology. Here are some of my takewaways:

  • Supply chain transparency and traceability are different things - and they're both becoming business as usual across industries including food and agriculture, apparel, electronics, beauty, and more…

  • Satellite monitoring, especially using a new generation of micro-satellites, is enabling global coverage for issues that include deforestation - on a daily basis!

  • It's now possible to monitor every chemical in every product every day to make sure there are no prohibited substances in any consumer goods

  • Farm-level data is being collected via satellite, drone, and whatever means necessary to ensure the most efficient use of farmland - and pesticides, herbicides, and other advanced inputs - in real time

  • The ultimate assurance is possible for supply chain audits through proprietary DNA tagging of agricultural commodities including cotton

Find out more on the Sustainable Brands webpage and by staying in touch through the Sourcemap Newsletter!

How To: Validate Supply Chain Sustainability Claims … And Avoid Greenwashing

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Companies regularly make sustainability claims about their supply chains, from ethical and organic to deforestation- and child labor-free. These claims were traditionally backed up by audits and certifications, which only validate a sample of suppliers. But new legislation requires accountability for the end-to-end supply chain. With companies sourcing from thousands of suppliers and new technology that enables end-to-end traceability, audits and certification are no longer best practice: it’s time for comprehensive supply chain due diligence. That’s where supply chain transparency comes in. Here’s how it works:

  1. Know your suppliers, down to the last one. That means discovering who supplies your suppliers and their suppliers, and building up an extended database of every farm, every mine, every factory and distribution center, until you can trace each product from raw material finished good.

  2. Understand your risks: benchmark your suppliers to make sure that they live up to your codes of conduct, and incentivize them to improve performance year over year. This includes collecting data on their practices and comparing that self-reported data with trusted third-party sources.

  3. Verify the authenticity of your supply chain: make sure that your suppliers are actually who they claim to be by tracing and reconciling every transaction. Anything less than traceability means you’re exposed to smuggling or adulteration, which means your supply chains isn’t what you think it is.

  4. Validate the supply chain: this is the most important part. Make sure that there is a clear, well-documented business process in place to validate the data through buy-in from internal and external stakeholders and a secure tracking repository.

At Sourcemap we empower companies to take 100% control of their extended supply chains through software that supports best-in-class business processes, all while saving time and money. Get in touch and find out how easy it can be. Your general counsel will love you for it.

SPLC Panel: Important Trends In Disclosure, Traceability, Big Data, And New Value Creation

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Last week Sourcemap CEO Leonardo Bonanni participated in a panel at SPLC 2019 with MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics researchers Alexis Bateman and Suzanne Greene.

While everyone acknowledges the future of supply chains is transparent, few can agree on what transparency is and how it should be achieved. The three speakers presented on the journey to supply chain transparency, starting with Alexis, who introduced the journey, to Leonardo, who presented case studies from early adopters of end-to-end transparency, and concluding with Suzanne with ideas for future areas where transparency can go. Here are some of the takeaways from the conference:

  • Supply chain transparency is here to stay, and in many instances it’s already law:

    • EU and US conflict minerals due diligence acts

    • California Supply Chain Transparency act

    • French and Swiss supply chain vigilance laws

    • UK and Australian modern slavery laws

  • Supply chain transparency requires new business processes including communications and IT infrastructure, and as such it follows an innovation adoption curve:

    • The Majority of companies have implemented codes of conduct and audits over their own facilities and direct suppliers

    • An Early Majority have begun to identify and benchmark their second-tier suppliers

    • Early Adopters are implementing traceability across their end-to-end supply chains

    • Innovators have begun communicating the end-to-end supply chain transparently with customers and consumers

  • There are many industries where supply chain transparency has yet to become adopted, including the mining and metals sectors, which are becoming increasingly important to high-tech industries including semiconductors and electric cars.

For more information on the panel, Sourcemap and MIT CTL feel free to contact us: info@sourcemap.com

Responsible Jewelry = Traceable Jewelry

When the Kimberley Scheme for conflict-free diamonds was introduced in 2003, it was one of the earliest traceability programs in ethical sourcing. But bagging and tagging rough stones is no longer the best practice: today some producers laser-etch polished stones with unique serial numbers. What about rough and colored stones? Old-fashioned record-keeping is still the norm for much of the jewelry industry: paper ledgers, spreadsheets, proprietary databases. These systems are so shoddy some shipments are being turned away from US ports for missing proof of origin. Without a digital supply chain, there are few ways to verify the source of stones. Add that to the complexity in tracking precious metals from areas at risk of conflict, and it’s clear the time has come for the jewelry industry to adopt mine-to-retail traceability for every gem, every metal ingot it purchases.

Using technology that's already proven in remote supply chains, Sourcemap is able to track and trace any number of transactions across the end-to-end supply chain. A new workflow management platform allows the data to be automatically analyzed for anomalies, approved and audited. It can even provide item-level traceability to the end customer. Sourcemap is the all-in-one due diligence solution for the jewelry sector. Click below to download our free resource on implementing responsible sourcing.

What is the difference between supply chain mapping, traceability and transparency?

Ever since Patagonia published its supplier map in 2007, the terms ‘supply chain mapping’, ‘traceability’ and 'transparency’ have been used interchangeably. To a consumer, there is little difference: at the end of the day, they enable you to see where a product came from. But to a brand, it’s the difference between making a claim, verifying it, and publicizing it. They’re related, but the underlying processes and technologies are completely different.

Mapping = Discovery

Supply chain mapping is the process of engaging with direct suppliers to discover indirect suppliers, resulting in an understanding of the end-to-end supply chain for a material, a product, or a brand. It is usually the only time a company gets in touch with indirect suppliers, so it’s a good time to collect data on quality control, social and environmental performance and make sure the indirect supply chain lives up to the brand’s standards. Supply chain mapping is also the foundation for risk planning, conflict minerals reporting and modern slavery / EU vigilance due diligence.

Traceability = Assurance

Many companies are eager to publish their supply chains once they’re mapped. Your legal department will ask for more: that’s because supply chain mapping is only based on supplier disclosure. Supply chain traceability is the process of tracking every commercial transaction in the end-to-end supply chain to account for the time and place where every step occurred in the supply chain of a unit, batch or lot of finished good. Traceability offers a number of advantages, from real-time chain of custody reports to verification that products are authentic and vendors are certified. It's also becoming law, from pharmaceutical serialization to US FDA food safety.

Transparency = Disclosure

Having mapped your supply chain and made it traceable, you're ready to share the results with stakeholders. Supply chain transparency is the process of disclosing suppliers to private customers and/or public consumers. Committing to supply chain transparency is usually the most effective way to drive the new business processes needed for mapping and traceability. It's also the right thing to do.

Want to learn how to implement supply chain mapping, traceability, and transparency? Get in touch to schedule a demo:

Sourcemap at the 13th Forum on Responsible Minerals

Responsible gems and minerals are a hot topic, with over 80,000 artisanal miners being registered into responsible supply chains in the past two years alone. But some reports have claimed that shifts in regulation have had an overall negative impact on miners’ earnings and on the commercial viability of some local traders and exporters.

Eight years ago the OECD published its Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals, an international framework for companies to avoid contributing to conflict through their mineral purchasing practices. The Dodd Frank Act (US) and the new EU regulation on conflict minerals refer to the OECD's guidance as a best practice in responsible minerals sourcing.

Last week, the Sourcemap team joined more than 900 attendees at the OECD's 13th Forum on Responsible Minerals in Paris. Here is what we learned:

  • The London Metal Exchange introduced mandatory responsible sourcing requirements that will be implemented by 2022.

  • The World Bank launched the first annual report on the State of ASM: 2019 State of the Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining Sector.

  • The Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) revised its Code of Practices to include due diligence requirements based on the OECD Guidance.

  • The World Jewellery Confederation (CIBJO) announced a new Blue Book providing guidance for responsible sourcing in the jewellery sector.

  • Ulula and the International Peace Information Service (IPIS) published a report assessing the impact of due diligence programmes on mining communities in the eastern provinces of the DRC.

  • Several companies announced their transparency and traceability goals for gems and minerals.

The OECD was an important event for Sourcemap too, as we introduced our new Responsible Mineral Platform to help companies implement supply chain due diligence when it comes to responsible mineral sourcing. The platform lets companies track any mineral down to the mine through an automated online process. It works by connecting the entire supply chain down to the smelters and mines, verifying transactions, monitoring performance and managing improvement plans toward corporate and regulatory targets. The Responsible Minerals Platform even lets companies monitor worker livelihoods and the impact your responsible sourcing programs are having on local communities (access to education, miner wages, child labor etc.) To find out more, visit Sourcemap's free responsible mineral sourcing resource here.



Keep up with the new OECD guidance on Conflict Minerals with Sourcemap's Responsible Minerals Platform

Dodd-Frank conflict minerals disclosure ushered in supply chain transparency law, and now it's been superseded by the new EU requirements. What's changed? Transparency isn't enough: companies have to show that they perform due diligence on their extended conflict minerals supply chain, ensuring that risk is monitored and improvement plans are put in place. The best practice is to follow the OECD's guidance - something Sourcemap can do out-of-the-box. Download our free brochure and get in touch to implement best-in-class due diligence practices, for now and for the future. Click the link below:

Investing in a Sustainable Supply Chain Now Could Save Brands’ Future [Footwear News]

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The shopping habits of millennials and Gen Z have changed the way brands sell their products; experiences, e-commerce pop-ups and personalization are dominating retail. But these consumers also value sustainability and ethical business practices, which many brands have been slower to address at the risk of lowering margins.

Read the rest on Footwear News

Last Week, IBM Traced 28 Tons of Oranges Using Blockchain. Also Last Week, Sourcemap Traced 1,000 Tons of Cocoa - No Blockchain Required.

The First Step to Traceability: Stenciling Batch Numbers on Bags of Cocoa at a Depot in Ghana

The First Step to Traceability: Stenciling Batch Numbers on Bags of Cocoa at a Depot in Ghana

There’s a lot of hype around using blockchain to trace supply chains. How does it stand up in the real world? The most widely publicized blockchain pilots involve shippers and retailers - the ‘last leg’ of a global supply chain. What happens when you want to trace a product from the source, and that source is halfway around the world?

Global supply chains include people from every walk of life, from smallholder farmers to corporate executives. The challenge with traceability is finding a solution that can handle the complexity of global trade while being easy to adopt each step of the way. Sourcemap uses proven technology, including the graph databases that power social networks and mobile apps that work on the most common devices. And of course, spreadsheets.

You can trust the data. Everything that’s uploaded to Sourcemap is encrypted and changes are tracked, so there is no chance of someone altering a record without being detected. And the app is lightweight, so it’s used to capture lots of additional data: farm areas, workforce statistics, indicators for safety and hygiene. You can rest assured, not only that the source of products is authentic, but also that important risks such as child labor and deforestation are minimized.

Traceability isn’t about blockchain, it’s about digitizing the supply chain. Once paper- and spreadsheet-based records are uploaded to the cloud, the savings are immense: no more document handling, better quality control, fewer delays and disruptions, less risk. To learn more about the agile ways that end-to-end traceability is being implemented in supply chains around the world, get in touch. We’d love to hear from you.

Source

Blockchain and Fast Fashion [Novethic]

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French blog Novethic quotes Sourcemap CEO in the article “POURQUOI LA BLOCKCHAIN NE RÉVOLUTIONNERA PAS LA FAST FASHION” (Why Blockchain Won't Revolutionize Fast Fashion)

Cocoa in the cloud: Traceability goes paperless in digital evolution [Confectionery News]

Cocoa traceability is entering the digital era with companies aiming to collect far more than the weight of a bag via a paper receipt.

HTTPS://WWW.CONFECTIONERYNEWS.COM/ARTICLE/2018/05/15/COCOA-IN-THE-CLOUD-TRACEABILITY-GOES-PAPERLESS-IN-DIGITAL-EVOLUTION

Is Your Supply Chain Blockchain-Ready?

It’s been called “transformative,” “revolutionary,” and “likely to change the world,” but is Blockchain the right technology for your supply chain? 

The ultimate goals of supply chain management are Traceability (the ability to track a product from raw material to consumer) and Transparency (continuous visibility from end-to-end, including real-time data on performance, quality, risk, and other key performance indicators). Conscious consumers, emerging regulations, and operational best practices are all pushing for this change. 

Blockchain can help brands achieve both Traceability and Transparency – but some important steps need to be taken before the technology can be adopted supply chain-wide.  To begin with, you can't make your suppliers adopt a groundbreaking technology unless you know who they are - both direct (Tier-1) and indirect (Tier-2, 3, down to raw materials). Then you need to align with your suppliers on transparency and traceability - that is, assuming they're ready to jump on board. That's why we've put together this simple questionnaire to determine if your supply chain is blockchain-ready.

Ask yourself these questions:

  1. Have you mapped your supply chain, including names, contact information and locations of all suppliers from raw materials to finished goods?
  2. Have you identified risks and opportunities across the end-to-end supply chain where traceability and transparency could bring important ROI?
  3. Have you assessed your suppliers' supply chain technology maturity, for example, whether their ERP/PLM is cloud-enabled?
  4. Have you defined and communicated your supply chain transparency expectations with every stakeholder in your supply chain?

If you answered "yes" to all of these, then your supply chain is blockchain-ready, and will likely benefit from the enhanced security, authenticity, and the distributed costs of distributed ledger technology. But if you’re one of many who didn’t get beyond question 1 or 2, then you need to enhance your supply chain visibility and communications before you and your suppliers can take advantage of blockchain.

Blockchain might very well be “the next internet.” But like the internet in its early days, the killer applications of blockchain have not been well-defined. Before you implement blockchain, consider whether your supply chain is blockchain-ready – and if you’re not sure, ask an expert if it’s the right solution for you.

Any questions? Get in touch.

Sourcemap CEO, “Manufacturers have no excuses for lack of transparency in cobalt mining.”

Cobalt prices have quadrupled since hitting an all-time low just two years ago. The material’s use in the rechargeable batteries of electric cars and smartphones triggered a spike in the market and demand isn’t expected to slow.

Unfortunately, most corporations lack visibility of their cobalt supply chain beyond the smelters that purchase the ore from mines, or intermediaries. According to Amnesty International, the lack of accountability has led to insidious mining conditions, particularly in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), which produces 60 percent of the world’s cobalt. Nearly 150,000 people work in “artisanal” mines plagued with collapsing shafts and harsh work environments. An estimated 40,000 child laborers are cheated out of pay, vulnerable to harm, and often handle the toxic material without gloves or masks.

In this piece published in Eco-Business, Sourcemap CEO Dr. Leo Bonanni argues that there is no excuse for companies not maintaining 100% traceability in their cobalt supply chains. The type of end-to-end traceability software that Sourcemap has used to map some of the world’s most complex supply chains can help rid high-risk and inhumane activities from cobalt sourcing.

Article: http://www.eco-business.com/opinion/no-excuses-for-lack-of-transparency-in-cobalt-mining/

 

HOW BLOCKCHAIN COULD CHANGE THE ETHICAL FASHION GAME

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"Fashion supply chains are way too complicated to be traced using any person-to-person traditional communication," says SourceMap founder Leonardo Bonanni over the phone. "You need some really advanced technology to actually track fashion, especially in a world of fast fashion and global brands."

https://fashionista.com/2018/04/what-is-blockchain-explained-ethical-fashion-supply-chain

This Tech Startup Could Revolutionize The Fashion Industry With Its Latest Project [Forbes]

Sourcemap, a New York City tech start-up is building a platform, that could transform the fashion industry: a digital map of all clothing manufacturers in Bangladesh.

Read the full article at https://www.forbes.com/sites/eshachhabra/2018/03/30/this-tech-startup-could-revolutionize-the-fashion-industry-with-its-latest-project/#356582bf72f2

Sourcemap travels to Dhaka to launch massive digital mapping of Bangladeshi garment factories

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The Sourcemap team travelled to Dhaka, Bangladesh last month to kick off the door-to-door census of every garment factory in the country: a Digital Ready-Made Factory Map of Bangladesh. Local data collectors equipped with mobile apps have begun to amass thousands of GPS-linked data points collected on the ground from factory owners, workers and organizations. As this data is fed into Sourcemap’s supply chain mapping and transparency platform, we will be able to provide global apparel brands and consumers with radical transparency in one of world’s largest garment producing regions.

The timing of the project is critical. April 24 will mark five years since the factory collapse at Rana Plaza outside Dhaka that took the lives of 1,135 people. North American and European apparel brands have already announced their intention to walk away from the safety tracking programs formed in response to the tragedy once they expire in May.  

Sourcemap is partnering with C&A Foundation and BRAC University (BRAC U) in Bangladesh to administer the survey. Together, we will create a new digital factory map that will democratize data collection and transparency by permanently transitioning accountability for factory improvements to Bangladeshis.  

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“A big part of our commitment to have Bangladeshis own and control this data comes down to designing the right interface,” said Rhea Rakshit, Director of Design for Sourcemap. “The goal is to make it as simple as possible to collect data from factories on the ground, and then allow apparel brands and other stakeholders to gain access to it through an easy to use mapping platform.”

While on the ground in Dhaka, our team witnessed just how critical the garment industry was to Bangladesh. The industry employs approximately four million people. Alarmingly though, most workers report to factories that are invisible on the supply chain – even to the multinational brands ultimately purchasing their products.

The BRAC U survey will put each of these factories on the map. In addition to factory and worker statistics, types of products manufactured, the names of clothing brands that each factory manufactures for will also be captured. All data will be uploaded on Sourcemap cloud servers and visible to the public. Ultimately, this transparency will increase the accountability of brands, decrease risk to workers, and add value to Bangladeshi products.

Dr. Leonardo Bonanni, CEO of Sourcemap, remarked on the project, “The crowdsourced garment factory map promises to make the ‘Made in Bangladesh’ label an asset to apparel brands and a point of consumer pride worldwide.”

What it's really going to take for sustainability to work [Sourcing Journal]

by Tara Donaldson

Posted on January 23, 2018 in Feature.

The thing about sustainability in the apparel industry is that brands and retailers are either embracing it of their own accord, finding themselves backed into a corner with little other option, or faking it until they make it.

The latter, of course, is where the problem of compliance arises.

“I’m kind of pessimistic when it comes to sustainability, compliance, traceability,” Sourcing Journal president Edward Hertzman said speaking on a Texworld USA supply chain panel Monday.

Having spent years in sourcing prior to publishing, Hertzman said he’s had brands ask him to manufacture organic product for them, and he’s gone to factories to source it, only to find that the suppliers are selling the brands goods labeled as organic when they’re in fact no such thing.

“It’s very complex to trace this. There isn’t necessarily one set of standards that everyone follows,” Hertzman said. “I think we are a long way from this being part of every single company’s culture.”

The problem, according to Dr. Leonardo Bonanni, founder and CEO of Sourcemap, a supply chain-mapping software company, is that the apparel industry has faced structural issues that haven’t exactly served to fuel transparency and traceability.

Until recently, Bonanni said, “You actually couldn’t map a supply chain for an apparel product,” largely because brands themselves couldn’t see past their Tier 1 suppliers—a problem which still remains for some companies.

Read the rest of the article at Sourcing Journal.