Supply Chain Mapping

Evolving Tech for Supply Chain Transparency [Sustainable Brands 2019 Panel]

Vans on Sourcemap

Last week I had the pleasure of participating in Sustainable Brands 2019 as part of the panel moderated by Mia Overall of Overall Strategies, and with Pete Girard of Toxnot, Tara O'Shea of Planet, David Potere of Indigo and Jamie Tomkins of Oritain. Altogether the panel provided cutting-edge insight into the future of supply chain transparency powered by technology. Here are some of my takewaways:

  • Supply chain transparency and traceability are different things - and they're both becoming business as usual across industries including food and agriculture, apparel, electronics, beauty, and more…

  • Satellite monitoring, especially using a new generation of micro-satellites, is enabling global coverage for issues that include deforestation - on a daily basis!

  • It's now possible to monitor every chemical in every product every day to make sure there are no prohibited substances in any consumer goods

  • Farm-level data is being collected via satellite, drone, and whatever means necessary to ensure the most efficient use of farmland - and pesticides, herbicides, and other advanced inputs - in real time

  • The ultimate assurance is possible for supply chain audits through proprietary DNA tagging of agricultural commodities including cotton

Find out more on the Sustainable Brands webpage and by staying in touch through the Sourcemap Newsletter!

What is the difference between supply chain mapping, traceability and transparency?

Ever since Patagonia published its supplier map in 2007, the terms ‘supply chain mapping’, ‘traceability’ and 'transparency’ have been used interchangeably. To a consumer, there is little difference: at the end of the day, they enable you to see where a product came from. But to a brand, it’s the difference between making a claim, verifying it, and publicizing it. They’re related, but the underlying processes and technologies are completely different.

Mapping = Discovery

Supply chain mapping is the process of engaging with direct suppliers to discover indirect suppliers, resulting in an understanding of the end-to-end supply chain for a material, a product, or a brand. It is usually the only time a company gets in touch with indirect suppliers, so it’s a good time to collect data on quality control, social and environmental performance and make sure the indirect supply chain lives up to the brand’s standards. Supply chain mapping is also the foundation for risk planning, conflict minerals reporting and modern slavery / EU vigilance due diligence.

Traceability = Assurance

Many companies are eager to publish their supply chains once they’re mapped. Your legal department will ask for more: that’s because supply chain mapping is only based on supplier disclosure. Supply chain traceability is the process of tracking every commercial transaction in the end-to-end supply chain to account for the time and place where every step occurred in the supply chain of a unit, batch or lot of finished good. Traceability offers a number of advantages, from real-time chain of custody reports to verification that products are authentic and vendors are certified. It's also becoming law, from pharmaceutical serialization to US FDA food safety.

Transparency = Disclosure

Having mapped your supply chain and made it traceable, you're ready to share the results with stakeholders. Supply chain transparency is the process of disclosing suppliers to private customers and/or public consumers. Committing to supply chain transparency is usually the most effective way to drive the new business processes needed for mapping and traceability. It's also the right thing to do.

Want to learn how to implement supply chain mapping, traceability, and transparency? Get in touch to schedule a demo:

Keep up with the new OECD guidance on Conflict Minerals with Sourcemap's Responsible Minerals Platform

Dodd-Frank conflict minerals disclosure ushered in supply chain transparency law, and now it's been superseded by the new EU requirements. What's changed? Transparency isn't enough: companies have to show that they perform due diligence on their extended conflict minerals supply chain, ensuring that risk is monitored and improvement plans are put in place. The best practice is to follow the OECD's guidance - something Sourcemap can do out-of-the-box. Download our free brochure and get in touch to implement best-in-class due diligence practices, for now and for the future. Click the link below:

Investing in a Sustainable Supply Chain Now Could Save Brands’ Future [Footwear News]

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The shopping habits of millennials and Gen Z have changed the way brands sell their products; experiences, e-commerce pop-ups and personalization are dominating retail. But these consumers also value sustainability and ethical business practices, which many brands have been slower to address at the risk of lowering margins.

Read the rest on Footwear News

Last Week, IBM Traced 28 Tons of Oranges Using Blockchain. Also Last Week, Sourcemap Traced 1,000 Tons of Cocoa - No Blockchain Required.

The First Step to Traceability: Stenciling Batch Numbers on Bags of Cocoa at a Depot in Ghana

The First Step to Traceability: Stenciling Batch Numbers on Bags of Cocoa at a Depot in Ghana

There’s a lot of hype around using blockchain to trace supply chains. How does it stand up in the real world? The most widely publicized blockchain pilots involve shippers and retailers - the ‘last leg’ of a global supply chain. What happens when you want to trace a product from the source, and that source is halfway around the world?

Global supply chains include people from every walk of life, from smallholder farmers to corporate executives. The challenge with traceability is finding a solution that can handle the complexity of global trade while being easy to adopt each step of the way. Sourcemap uses proven technology, including the graph databases that power social networks and mobile apps that work on the most common devices. And of course, spreadsheets.

You can trust the data. Everything that’s uploaded to Sourcemap is encrypted and changes are tracked, so there is no chance of someone altering a record without being detected. And the app is lightweight, so it’s used to capture lots of additional data: farm areas, workforce statistics, indicators for safety and hygiene. You can rest assured, not only that the source of products is authentic, but also that important risks such as child labor and deforestation are minimized.

Traceability isn’t about blockchain, it’s about digitizing the supply chain. Once paper- and spreadsheet-based records are uploaded to the cloud, the savings are immense: no more document handling, better quality control, fewer delays and disruptions, less risk. To learn more about the agile ways that end-to-end traceability is being implemented in supply chains around the world, get in touch. We’d love to hear from you.

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World’s first free digital map of apparel factories now online

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NEW YORK CITY – Sourcemap gave the apparel industry, manufacturers, and consumers worldwide unprecedented access to the factories making their clothes with today’s launch of the Open Apparel Registry (OAR) — an open, crowdsourced database of apparel facilities around the world.

The online tool creates a common and standardized resource of facility names and addresses that is completely free and easy to search. As the first advanced name-and-address matching system for the apparel industry, the OAR will create historic transparency and accountability in an industry plagued by systemic sustainability challenges and inhumane employment practices.

“The Open Apparel Registry has been a years-long effort to help consumers, companies and NGO's make certain that the factories they think their clothes are coming from are actually the right ones,” said Dr. Leo Bonanni, founder and CEO of Sourcemap. “Apparel facilities can now be searched much like finding an address on Google Maps, which we expect will create an industry where one-day, every article of clothing is traced to its source.”

Currently, most apparel factories are logged across multiple, inconsistent databases. Many more facilities are completely unaccounted for. Even the most conscientious brands have struggled to maintain visibility over the manufacturers beyond the first tier of their supply chains. The lack of accountability has led to the apparel industry’s failed attempts to rid supply chains of forced labor, child labor, poor working conditions, and environmentally harmful practices. 

The OAR is funded by the C&A Foundation. It marks Sourcemap’s largest open-source project to date. Nonprofit partnerships and corporate alliances have attempted to conduct similar large-scale mapping projects without success.

Sourcemap is recognized as the leader in mapping and transparency platforms for industry groups. C&A Foundation is also sponsoring Sourcemap’s partnership with BRAC University (BRACU) on a breakthrough project to survey and map every garment factory in Bangladesh. Sourcemap currently powers the latest generation of the Higg Index platform, the leading suite of tools for measuring social and environmental sustainability across the apparel, footwear and textile industries. The Green Electronic Council’s newly reimagined EPEAT Registry for sustainable IT products also runs on Sourcemap’s platform.

The OAR is now live at openapparel.org

Read the news release on Ecotextile News >

Blockchain and Fast Fashion [Novethic]

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French blog Novethic quotes Sourcemap CEO in the article “POURQUOI LA BLOCKCHAIN NE RÉVOLUTIONNERA PAS LA FAST FASHION” (Why Blockchain Won't Revolutionize Fast Fashion)

Cocoa in the cloud: Traceability goes paperless in digital evolution [Confectionery News]

Cocoa traceability is entering the digital era with companies aiming to collect far more than the weight of a bag via a paper receipt.

HTTPS://WWW.CONFECTIONERYNEWS.COM/ARTICLE/2018/05/15/COCOA-IN-THE-CLOUD-TRACEABILITY-GOES-PAPERLESS-IN-DIGITAL-EVOLUTION

Is Your Supply Chain Blockchain-Ready?

It’s been called “transformative,” “revolutionary,” and “likely to change the world,” but is Blockchain the right technology for your supply chain? 

The ultimate goals of supply chain management are Traceability (the ability to track a product from raw material to consumer) and Transparency (continuous visibility from end-to-end, including real-time data on performance, quality, risk, and other key performance indicators). Conscious consumers, emerging regulations, and operational best practices are all pushing for this change. 

Blockchain can help brands achieve both Traceability and Transparency – but some important steps need to be taken before the technology can be adopted supply chain-wide.  To begin with, you can't make your suppliers adopt a groundbreaking technology unless you know who they are - both direct (Tier-1) and indirect (Tier-2, 3, down to raw materials). Then you need to align with your suppliers on transparency and traceability - that is, assuming they're ready to jump on board. That's why we've put together this simple questionnaire to determine if your supply chain is blockchain-ready.

Ask yourself these questions:

  1. Have you mapped your supply chain, including names, contact information and locations of all suppliers from raw materials to finished goods?
  2. Have you identified risks and opportunities across the end-to-end supply chain where traceability and transparency could bring important ROI?
  3. Have you assessed your suppliers' supply chain technology maturity, for example, whether their ERP/PLM is cloud-enabled?
  4. Have you defined and communicated your supply chain transparency expectations with every stakeholder in your supply chain?

If you answered "yes" to all of these, then your supply chain is blockchain-ready, and will likely benefit from the enhanced security, authenticity, and the distributed costs of distributed ledger technology. But if you’re one of many who didn’t get beyond question 1 or 2, then you need to enhance your supply chain visibility and communications before you and your suppliers can take advantage of blockchain.

Blockchain might very well be “the next internet.” But like the internet in its early days, the killer applications of blockchain have not been well-defined. Before you implement blockchain, consider whether your supply chain is blockchain-ready – and if you’re not sure, ask an expert if it’s the right solution for you.

Any questions? Get in touch.

Sourcemap CEO, “Manufacturers have no excuses for lack of transparency in cobalt mining.”

Cobalt prices have quadrupled since hitting an all-time low just two years ago. The material’s use in the rechargeable batteries of electric cars and smartphones triggered a spike in the market and demand isn’t expected to slow.

Unfortunately, most corporations lack visibility of their cobalt supply chain beyond the smelters that purchase the ore from mines, or intermediaries. According to Amnesty International, the lack of accountability has led to insidious mining conditions, particularly in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), which produces 60 percent of the world’s cobalt. Nearly 150,000 people work in “artisanal” mines plagued with collapsing shafts and harsh work environments. An estimated 40,000 child laborers are cheated out of pay, vulnerable to harm, and often handle the toxic material without gloves or masks.

In this piece published in Eco-Business, Sourcemap CEO Dr. Leo Bonanni argues that there is no excuse for companies not maintaining 100% traceability in their cobalt supply chains. The type of end-to-end traceability software that Sourcemap has used to map some of the world’s most complex supply chains can help rid high-risk and inhumane activities from cobalt sourcing.

Article: http://www.eco-business.com/opinion/no-excuses-for-lack-of-transparency-in-cobalt-mining/

 

Sourcemap travels to Dhaka to launch massive digital mapping of Bangladeshi garment factories

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The Sourcemap team travelled to Dhaka, Bangladesh last month to kick off the door-to-door census of every garment factory in the country: a Digital Ready-Made Factory Map of Bangladesh. Local data collectors equipped with mobile apps have begun to amass thousands of GPS-linked data points collected on the ground from factory owners, workers and organizations. As this data is fed into Sourcemap’s supply chain mapping and transparency platform, we will be able to provide global apparel brands and consumers with radical transparency in one of world’s largest garment producing regions.

The timing of the project is critical. April 24 will mark five years since the factory collapse at Rana Plaza outside Dhaka that took the lives of 1,135 people. North American and European apparel brands have already announced their intention to walk away from the safety tracking programs formed in response to the tragedy once they expire in May.  

Sourcemap is partnering with C&A Foundation and BRAC University (BRAC U) in Bangladesh to administer the survey. Together, we will create a new digital factory map that will democratize data collection and transparency by permanently transitioning accountability for factory improvements to Bangladeshis.  

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“A big part of our commitment to have Bangladeshis own and control this data comes down to designing the right interface,” said Rhea Rakshit, Director of Design for Sourcemap. “The goal is to make it as simple as possible to collect data from factories on the ground, and then allow apparel brands and other stakeholders to gain access to it through an easy to use mapping platform.”

While on the ground in Dhaka, our team witnessed just how critical the garment industry was to Bangladesh. The industry employs approximately four million people. Alarmingly though, most workers report to factories that are invisible on the supply chain – even to the multinational brands ultimately purchasing their products.

The BRAC U survey will put each of these factories on the map. In addition to factory and worker statistics, types of products manufactured, the names of clothing brands that each factory manufactures for will also be captured. All data will be uploaded on Sourcemap cloud servers and visible to the public. Ultimately, this transparency will increase the accountability of brands, decrease risk to workers, and add value to Bangladeshi products.

Dr. Leonardo Bonanni, CEO of Sourcemap, remarked on the project, “The crowdsourced garment factory map promises to make the ‘Made in Bangladesh’ label an asset to apparel brands and a point of consumer pride worldwide.”

What it's really going to take for sustainability to work [Sourcing Journal]

by Tara Donaldson

Posted on January 23, 2018 in Feature.

The thing about sustainability in the apparel industry is that brands and retailers are either embracing it of their own accord, finding themselves backed into a corner with little other option, or faking it until they make it.

The latter, of course, is where the problem of compliance arises.

“I’m kind of pessimistic when it comes to sustainability, compliance, traceability,” Sourcing Journal president Edward Hertzman said speaking on a Texworld USA supply chain panel Monday.

Having spent years in sourcing prior to publishing, Hertzman said he’s had brands ask him to manufacture organic product for them, and he’s gone to factories to source it, only to find that the suppliers are selling the brands goods labeled as organic when they’re in fact no such thing.

“It’s very complex to trace this. There isn’t necessarily one set of standards that everyone follows,” Hertzman said. “I think we are a long way from this being part of every single company’s culture.”

The problem, according to Dr. Leonardo Bonanni, founder and CEO of Sourcemap, a supply chain-mapping software company, is that the apparel industry has faced structural issues that haven’t exactly served to fuel transparency and traceability.

Until recently, Bonanni said, “You actually couldn’t map a supply chain for an apparel product,” largely because brands themselves couldn’t see past their Tier 1 suppliers—a problem which still remains for some companies.

Read the rest of the article at Sourcing Journal.

Supply chain mapping meets blockchain tracking: Provenance partners with Sourcemap to power end-to-end, robust traceability for consumer goods

Sourcemap, New York, and Provenance, London, link their digital platforms for supply chain transparency, enabling businesses in the food and fashion industries to map their supply chain, gather data and track verified claims with the movement of product.

Combining Sourcemap’s upstream mapping, macro risk analysis, and data capture with Provenance-verified business and product claims, as well as downstream batch-level tracking for automatic supply chain traceability.

Combining Sourcemap’s upstream mapping, macro risk analysis, and data capture with Provenance-verified business and product claims, as well as downstream batch-level tracking for automatic supply chain traceability.

Sourcemap, New York, and Provenance, London, link their digital platforms for supply chain transparency, enabling businesses in the food and fashion industries to map their supply chain, gather data and track verified claims with the movement of product.

In 2016 alone, reports of food fraud in cheese, olive oil, beef and seafood* highlighted the business risks of opaque supply chains, and the growing consumer demand for knowledge. In May of 2017, 36 million pounds of imported non-organic soybeans were reported to have obtained “organic” labels** for domestic sale in the US. Across industries, robust systems for understanding these risks, and ensuring integrity in supply chains is needed more than ever.

Companies are clamoring for ways to trace their products, whether to protect their reputation, to inform their customers, or to ensure the quality and authenticity of goods. But today's supply chain software can't scale up to the complexity of modern supply chains.

Enter Sourcemap and Provenance. Sourcemap's supply chain social network connects all of the suppliers and sub-suppliers in a global network, ensuring that they are who they say they are. Provenance blockchain technology*** tracks every transaction between the suppliers in real-time, to verify that every product is sourced through the authorized chain of custody. Together, these two technologies are the first to have been conceived from the ground up, to track and trace even the most complex supply chains in real-time.

Combining Sourcemap’s upstream mapping, macro risk analysis, and data capture with Provenance-verified business and product claims, as well as downstream batch-level tracking for automatic supply chain traceability.

What does this mean? Provenance and Sourcemap are currently piloting their joint technology platform with major food businesses so that one day soon, you'll be able to scan a product on a store shelf and know exactly who made it, when and where. And that's just the beginning. You'll also be able to verify the quality, the social practices, the environmental footprint of everything you buy.

Integrated tools for the smart, sustainable supply chain.

Integrated tools for the smart, sustainable supply chain.

“Buyers and shoppers all over the world make daily moral and health compromises without knowing it. Tackling this problem involves several systems to unite and create joined-up solutions for change at scale,” says CEO of Provenance Jessi Baker. “We are excited to partner with Sourcemap to create the bulletproof traceability system industry needs”.

"Our enterprise customers are looking for every assurance that their supply chains are best-in-class, and we're thrilled to provide continuous verification through Provenance's blockchain technology," says Sourcemap CEO Leonardo Bonanni.

Interested? We’re working together with great businesses all along the supply chain across food, beverage, beauty and fashion industries. Contact us to find out how we can help your organization.

* https://www.forbes.com/sites/larryolmsted/2016/07/11/fake-food-scandals-a-bad-year-for-food-lovers
** https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/the-labels-said-organic-but-these-massive-imports-of-corn-and-soybeans-werent
*** https://www.provenance.org/technology

SOURCEMAP, XEROX WIN THE 2017 GEC CATALYST AWARDS

For too long companies have wanted to know more about their supply chains, only to be discouraged by the time and the resources needed to go it alone. That’s why we’re introducing a new kind of social network for brands and manufacturers within an industry to map their shared supply chains and collect data every step of the way – data essential to establishing benchmarks for social and environmental impact. We’re thrilled that the Green Electronics Council selected our Supply Chain Communities for this year’s Catalyzing Disruptive Innovation award at CES Asia, and look forward to working with the industry to advance visibility and sustainability throughout the global electronics supply chain.

From the Green Electronics Council's press release:

SHANGHAI, CHINA – June 8, 2017 – The Green Electronics Council (GEC) announced at CES Asia today that Xerox Corporation, a global document solutions, technologies and services corporation, and Sourcemap, Inc., the supply chain transparency company, won its 2017 GEC Catalyst Awards. GEC’s annual Catalyst Awards seek to inspire innovation in the design, manufacture and use of electronics to advance global sustainability.
GEC’s Catalyst Awards honor sustainability achievements in two categories. The “Catalyzing Impact at Scale” award recognizes the large-scale impact leading corporations can have when changing the design, manufacture and intended use of their products. GEC’s “Catalyzing Disruptive Innovation” award recognizes cutting-edge technologies that raise sustainability to a whole new level.
Xerox won the Catalyzing Impact at Scale Award for a global reverse supply-chain initiative that methodically analyzes ROI for remanufacture, refurbish, parts reuse, recycle, and broker sales. Sourcemap won the Catalyzing Disruptive Innovation Award for its supply-chain transparency community that ensures the sustainability of supply chains down to the raw material.
“The negative environmental and social impacts resulting from complex global supply chains are among the greatest challenges currently facing the IT industry,” said Nancy Gillis, CEO of the Green Electronics Council. “We congratulate this year’s Winners, Honorees, and Finalists for demonstrating ways to address this challenge and exhibiting sustainable supply chain leadership and innovation.”
An independent, expert Judging Committee selected the top Catalyst Award Winners and, for the first time, recognized three special Honorees. LG Electronics and Cisco Systems were each named “Catalyzing Impact at Scale” Honorees. A collaboration between Vodafone and Good World Solutions was selected as a “Catalyzing Disruptive Innovation” Honoree.
Xerox has long been recognized as an industry leader in end-of-life management, and over the past few years Xerox has optimized the global reverse logistics system to further enable a sustainable supply chain. The optimization utilizes a centralized control system, which calculates the value associated with sending a product through one of five potential processes, then selects the process that will create the greatest value. Through this optimized system and process improvements, Xerox has realized millions of dollars in cost benefit, achieved significant greenhouse gas savings and enabled numerous social sustainability benefits.
Sourcemap’s Supply Chain Transparency Community is a powerful new approach to providing industry-wide assurance of sustainability and compliance across the extended supply chain. It works through a shared repository of pre-competitive information on suppliers’ social and environmental performance fed by real-time data from a supplier social network, independently verified by machine learning algorithms and independent auditors. For the first time brands can achieve continuous supply chain assurance at low cost, while suppliers benefit from visibility and actionable benchmarks to help achieve best-in-class performance.
The five Finalists for the 2017 GEC Catalyst Awards were the Chinese Environmental United Certification CenterKaiser PermanentePacific Gas and Electric Companytoxnot PBC, and Umicore.
The Judging Committee for the 2017 Catalyst Awards included Walter Alcorn, Vice President, Environmental Affairs and Industry Sustainability at the Consumer Technology Association; Michael Massetti, Executive Partner, Supply Chain at Gartner; Karen Pollard, Environmental Protection Specialist at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Steve Rochlin, Americas Co-Manager at the Global E-Sustainability Initiative; Joel Sutherland, President of Envoy Inc.; and Matthew Swibel, Director, Corporate Sustainability at Lockheed Martin Corporation.
GEC announced the winners at CES Asia in Shanghai, China as an official program partner of the Consumer Technology Association (CTA). Past GEC Catalyst Awards winners include PuzzlePhone, AMD, and Dell, Inc.
The 2018 Catalyst Awards theme will be announced later this year.

Want to learn more about Sourcemap's Industry Communities? Get in touch

Open Sourcemap at 6 Months: 1,980 Transparent Supply Chains, 1,881 New Users, 47 GROUNDBREAKING Brands

In just six months since we launched our newest transparency platform, almost 1,900 users have registered - including brands such as Hershey's, Vivienne Westwood, Fairphone, Thread, and dozens more. Here are some of your favorites:

Source NY: the New York State Craft Beverage Community

Your beer may be locally brewed, but are the hops and barley? Find out with Source NY - the first supply chain community for craft beverage producers.

A social enterprise is a business for which social and environmental impact is core - and Thread is a great example. Browse the map above to find out how hundreds of trash collectors supplement their income to provide post-consumer recycled content for Timberland's boots.

The first Official account on Open Sourcemap is still one of the best: find out where Fairphone sources nearly 300 components and raw materials for its one-of-a-kind sustainable smartphone.

 

See How Vivienne Westwood, Karen Walker, Mimco and sass & bide support artisans in East AFrica: introducing Ethical Fashion Initiative + Sourcemap

We're proud to have been selected by the Ethical Fashion Initiative (Motto: Not Charity - Just Work) as the software for RISEmap: an online traceability platform highlighting the brands who support artisans in Kenya, Uganda, and Ethiopia through their supply chains. Accessible through QR codes on product hangtags and the EFI website itself, RISEmap highlights stories of unique crafts that sustain communities and supply unique products to globally recognized brands. Find out more by visiting the RISEmaps below:

Visit the RISE reports page to learn more about the work of the Ethical Fashion Initiative

Want to know where products come from? Introducing Open Sourcemap

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People have a right to know where things come from. That's why we're launching a brand new platform for supply chain transparency: Open Sourcemap. It's full of exciting new features, including Official accounts - for radically transparent brands - and the fastest, most powerful interface for supply chain mapping. So get in there, make some supply chain maps, ask your friends and colleagues to do the same, and soon there will be an even bigger directory of supply chains available to the public.

Here are some of the exciting new features of Open Sourcemap:

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Improved User Interface

You can map supply chains faster and more easily than ever before thanks to a completely re-built user interface for web and mobile.

Official accounts

Radically transparent companies can stand out with an 'Official' designation, which includes the ability to add Instagram, a logo and header image. Apply for an official account here.

WHO - WHAT - WHERE

We're making it easy for visitors to search for your company (WHO), the products you make (WHAT) and your location (WHERE) through a new map creation workflow.  

Related supply chains

Look for a filmstrip at the bottom of any supply chain page - it shows the related companies and products you might be interested in checking out.

Google Places integration

Every time you enter an address, we make sure it's as accurate as possible by matching it against Google's massive places database.

Photos and videos

Upload as many full-size images as you want to and embed youtube videos to tell the story of a particular supplier, product or process. The images will be shown full-size in a light-box when visitors click on them.

 

 

Sourcemap Selected as Palm Oil Supply Chain Innovator [SAWIT 2016]

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Palm oil plantation

In Jakarta November 17-18? Join us as part of the Smallholders Advancing with Innovation and Technology (SAWIT) Challenge. We'll be demonstrating our platform for smallholder sustainability, which combines smartphone field monitoring and cloud-based traceability with satellite heat maps to ensure deforestation-free agriculture. Learn more about our technology for traceability to combat deforestation here, and the SAWIT challenge here