Transparency

Making Sense of the New French Vigilance Law

2019 brings the most comprehensive end-to-end supply chain accountability legislation: the Droit de Vigilance , a statute requiring large companies operating in France to monitor and remediate human rights and environmental risk across their global operations, and their suppliers'. With multinational supply chains typically counting tens of thousands of facilities it's a task that can't be achieved manually - and with new technology, it doesn't even require added internal resources. It's all part of a culture shift toward transparency across supply chain industries. We've packaged our enterprise and reporting solutions into a solution that's perfect for managing the Droit de Vigilance today and as standards evolve. To find out more download our latest brochure (available in English and French!)

Evolving Tech for Supply Chain Transparency [Sustainable Brands 2019 Panel]

Vans on Sourcemap

Last week I had the pleasure of participating in Sustainable Brands 2019 as part of the panel moderated by Mia Overall of Overall Strategies, and with Pete Girard of Toxnot, Tara O'Shea of Planet, David Potere of Indigo and Jamie Tomkins of Oritain. Altogether the panel provided cutting-edge insight into the future of supply chain transparency powered by technology. Here are some of my takewaways:

  • Supply chain transparency and traceability are different things - and they're both becoming business as usual across industries including food and agriculture, apparel, electronics, beauty, and more…

  • Satellite monitoring, especially using a new generation of micro-satellites, is enabling global coverage for issues that include deforestation - on a daily basis!

  • It's now possible to monitor every chemical in every product every day to make sure there are no prohibited substances in any consumer goods

  • Farm-level data is being collected via satellite, drone, and whatever means necessary to ensure the most efficient use of farmland - and pesticides, herbicides, and other advanced inputs - in real time

  • The ultimate assurance is possible for supply chain audits through proprietary DNA tagging of agricultural commodities including cotton

Find out more on the Sustainable Brands webpage and by staying in touch through the Sourcemap Newsletter!

SPLC Panel: Important Trends In Disclosure, Traceability, Big Data, And New Value Creation

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Last week Sourcemap CEO Leonardo Bonanni participated in a panel at SPLC 2019 with MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics researchers Alexis Bateman and Suzanne Greene.

While everyone acknowledges the future of supply chains is transparent, few can agree on what transparency is and how it should be achieved. The three speakers presented on the journey to supply chain transparency, starting with Alexis, who introduced the journey, to Leonardo, who presented case studies from early adopters of end-to-end transparency, and concluding with Suzanne with ideas for future areas where transparency can go. Here are some of the takeaways from the conference:

  • Supply chain transparency is here to stay, and in many instances it’s already law:

    • EU and US conflict minerals due diligence acts

    • California Supply Chain Transparency act

    • French and Swiss supply chain vigilance laws

    • UK and Australian modern slavery laws

  • Supply chain transparency requires new business processes including communications and IT infrastructure, and as such it follows an innovation adoption curve:

    • The Majority of companies have implemented codes of conduct and audits over their own facilities and direct suppliers

    • An Early Majority have begun to identify and benchmark their second-tier suppliers

    • Early Adopters are implementing traceability across their end-to-end supply chains

    • Innovators have begun communicating the end-to-end supply chain transparently with customers and consumers

  • There are many industries where supply chain transparency has yet to become adopted, including the mining and metals sectors, which are becoming increasingly important to high-tech industries including semiconductors and electric cars.

For more information on the panel, Sourcemap and MIT CTL feel free to contact us: info@sourcemap.com

Blockchain and Fast Fashion [Novethic]

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French blog Novethic quotes Sourcemap CEO in the article “POURQUOI LA BLOCKCHAIN NE RÉVOLUTIONNERA PAS LA FAST FASHION” (Why Blockchain Won't Revolutionize Fast Fashion)

Green Electronics Council Partners with Sourcemap on Next-Gen IT Ecolabel

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The Green Electronics Council (GEC) has selected Sourcemap to modernize its flagship program, the EPEAT Registry.

The EPEAT Registry is a website used by large-scale purchasers globally to identify credible, cost-effective and innovative IT products. Sourcemap will redesign the site from the ground-up, improving purchasers’ ability to identify sustainable IT products by specific environmental and social criteria. The major IT brands whose products are featured on the EPEAT Registry will experience a more intuitive interface, making it easier for them to register and market their products that meet EPEAT criteria.

National governments, including the United States, and thousands of private and public institutional purchasers use EPEAT’s independent verification of manufacturers’ claims to inform their sustainable procurement decisions. Through its partnership with Sourcemap, GEC hopes to one-day allow EPEAT to verify entire supply chains, including suppliers and sub-components.

Redesigning the EPEAT Registry continues Sourcemap’s work in tracking and verifying sustainability in industry supply chains. Sourcemap built the current Higg Index platform for the Sustainable Apparel Coalition, which is used by more than 200 fashion brands to benchmark social and environmental performance across more than 6,000 supplier factories worldwide.

GEC expects to launch the revised EPEAT Registry in January 2019.

Read the full press release on Supply Chain Dive

Is Your Supply Chain Blockchain-Ready?

It’s been called “transformative,” “revolutionary,” and “likely to change the world,” but is Blockchain the right technology for your supply chain? 

The ultimate goals of supply chain management are Traceability (the ability to track a product from raw material to consumer) and Transparency (continuous visibility from end-to-end, including real-time data on performance, quality, risk, and other key performance indicators). Conscious consumers, emerging regulations, and operational best practices are all pushing for this change. 

Blockchain can help brands achieve both Traceability and Transparency – but some important steps need to be taken before the technology can be adopted supply chain-wide.  To begin with, you can't make your suppliers adopt a groundbreaking technology unless you know who they are - both direct (Tier-1) and indirect (Tier-2, 3, down to raw materials). Then you need to align with your suppliers on transparency and traceability - that is, assuming they're ready to jump on board. That's why we've put together this simple questionnaire to determine if your supply chain is blockchain-ready.

Ask yourself these questions:

  1. Have you mapped your supply chain, including names, contact information and locations of all suppliers from raw materials to finished goods?
  2. Have you identified risks and opportunities across the end-to-end supply chain where traceability and transparency could bring important ROI?
  3. Have you assessed your suppliers' supply chain technology maturity, for example, whether their ERP/PLM is cloud-enabled?
  4. Have you defined and communicated your supply chain transparency expectations with every stakeholder in your supply chain?

If you answered "yes" to all of these, then your supply chain is blockchain-ready, and will likely benefit from the enhanced security, authenticity, and the distributed costs of distributed ledger technology. But if you’re one of many who didn’t get beyond question 1 or 2, then you need to enhance your supply chain visibility and communications before you and your suppliers can take advantage of blockchain.

Blockchain might very well be “the next internet.” But like the internet in its early days, the killer applications of blockchain have not been well-defined. Before you implement blockchain, consider whether your supply chain is blockchain-ready – and if you’re not sure, ask an expert if it’s the right solution for you.

Any questions? Get in touch.

HOW BLOCKCHAIN COULD CHANGE THE ETHICAL FASHION GAME

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"Fashion supply chains are way too complicated to be traced using any person-to-person traditional communication," says SourceMap founder Leonardo Bonanni over the phone. "You need some really advanced technology to actually track fashion, especially in a world of fast fashion and global brands."

https://fashionista.com/2018/04/what-is-blockchain-explained-ethical-fashion-supply-chain

Sourcemap and Bluenumber now offer 100% Palm Oil Traceability

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Sourcemap and Bluenumber are teaming up to deliver the first solution to trace both where palm oil comes from and who produced it. The leaders in supply chain mapping and unique smallholder identification have co-developed a service to present verified and visualized data cheaper, faster and with greater assurance than traditional certification or sample-based fieldwork. 

Sourcemap, the global leader in supply chain mapping and transparency, and Bluenumber, developer and host for an independent registry of unique digital farmer and worker identities have jointly developed two groundbreaking offerings for palm oil transparency and traceability. The new services plug current data gaps in industry standard sustainable palm oil sourcing practices by creating end-to-end visibility. Users can now prove with precision that their palm oil supply chain is deforestation-free and socially responsible.

The basic 'Supply Map’ offering is designed to help buyers show their consumers and stakeholders from where and whom they source palm oil. The more advanced service, ‘Trace & Track,’ gives buyers highly detailed information on the origin, route and handling of every specific Palm Oil shipment received, including every smallholder and every mill involved in each specific delivery.

The new solution uses a proprietary technology suite including GPS enabled data collection apps for fieldwork. Bluenumber issues unique identifiers to verify every smallholder, estate worker and facility at every stage in the supply chain. The Sourcemap platform organizes and visualizes all data necessary to understand and present verified smallholders, mills and other actors. The integrated systems establish the relationships and transactions between people and places. The resulting visualization and data analysis reveals time-calibrated activity of smallholders and estates. Risk data associated with each actor or entity allow buyers at multiple levels in the supply chain to make more informed procurement decisions on where and whom to source from.

The solution works with palm oil supply chains that are certified under traditional programs, and with sources that are not certified.  To learn more, please get in touch.    

What it's really going to take for sustainability to work [Sourcing Journal]

by Tara Donaldson

Posted on January 23, 2018 in Feature.

The thing about sustainability in the apparel industry is that brands and retailers are either embracing it of their own accord, finding themselves backed into a corner with little other option, or faking it until they make it.

The latter, of course, is where the problem of compliance arises.

“I’m kind of pessimistic when it comes to sustainability, compliance, traceability,” Sourcing Journal president Edward Hertzman said speaking on a Texworld USA supply chain panel Monday.

Having spent years in sourcing prior to publishing, Hertzman said he’s had brands ask him to manufacture organic product for them, and he’s gone to factories to source it, only to find that the suppliers are selling the brands goods labeled as organic when they’re in fact no such thing.

“It’s very complex to trace this. There isn’t necessarily one set of standards that everyone follows,” Hertzman said. “I think we are a long way from this being part of every single company’s culture.”

The problem, according to Dr. Leonardo Bonanni, founder and CEO of Sourcemap, a supply chain-mapping software company, is that the apparel industry has faced structural issues that haven’t exactly served to fuel transparency and traceability.

Until recently, Bonanni said, “You actually couldn’t map a supply chain for an apparel product,” largely because brands themselves couldn’t see past their Tier 1 suppliers—a problem which still remains for some companies.

Read the rest of the article at Sourcing Journal.

Supply chain mapping meets blockchain tracking: Provenance partners with Sourcemap to power end-to-end, robust traceability for consumer goods

Sourcemap, New York, and Provenance, London, link their digital platforms for supply chain transparency, enabling businesses in the food and fashion industries to map their supply chain, gather data and track verified claims with the movement of product.

Combining Sourcemap’s upstream mapping, macro risk analysis, and data capture with Provenance-verified business and product claims, as well as downstream batch-level tracking for automatic supply chain traceability.

Combining Sourcemap’s upstream mapping, macro risk analysis, and data capture with Provenance-verified business and product claims, as well as downstream batch-level tracking for automatic supply chain traceability.

Sourcemap, New York, and Provenance, London, link their digital platforms for supply chain transparency, enabling businesses in the food and fashion industries to map their supply chain, gather data and track verified claims with the movement of product.

In 2016 alone, reports of food fraud in cheese, olive oil, beef and seafood* highlighted the business risks of opaque supply chains, and the growing consumer demand for knowledge. In May of 2017, 36 million pounds of imported non-organic soybeans were reported to have obtained “organic” labels** for domestic sale in the US. Across industries, robust systems for understanding these risks, and ensuring integrity in supply chains is needed more than ever.

Companies are clamoring for ways to trace their products, whether to protect their reputation, to inform their customers, or to ensure the quality and authenticity of goods. But today's supply chain software can't scale up to the complexity of modern supply chains.

Enter Sourcemap and Provenance. Sourcemap's supply chain social network connects all of the suppliers and sub-suppliers in a global network, ensuring that they are who they say they are. Provenance blockchain technology*** tracks every transaction between the suppliers in real-time, to verify that every product is sourced through the authorized chain of custody. Together, these two technologies are the first to have been conceived from the ground up, to track and trace even the most complex supply chains in real-time.

Combining Sourcemap’s upstream mapping, macro risk analysis, and data capture with Provenance-verified business and product claims, as well as downstream batch-level tracking for automatic supply chain traceability.

What does this mean? Provenance and Sourcemap are currently piloting their joint technology platform with major food businesses so that one day soon, you'll be able to scan a product on a store shelf and know exactly who made it, when and where. And that's just the beginning. You'll also be able to verify the quality, the social practices, the environmental footprint of everything you buy.

Integrated tools for the smart, sustainable supply chain.

Integrated tools for the smart, sustainable supply chain.

“Buyers and shoppers all over the world make daily moral and health compromises without knowing it. Tackling this problem involves several systems to unite and create joined-up solutions for change at scale,” says CEO of Provenance Jessi Baker. “We are excited to partner with Sourcemap to create the bulletproof traceability system industry needs”.

"Our enterprise customers are looking for every assurance that their supply chains are best-in-class, and we're thrilled to provide continuous verification through Provenance's blockchain technology," says Sourcemap CEO Leonardo Bonanni.

Interested? We’re working together with great businesses all along the supply chain across food, beverage, beauty and fashion industries. Contact us to find out how we can help your organization.

* https://www.forbes.com/sites/larryolmsted/2016/07/11/fake-food-scandals-a-bad-year-for-food-lovers
** https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/the-labels-said-organic-but-these-massive-imports-of-corn-and-soybeans-werent
*** https://www.provenance.org/technology

SOURCEMAP, XEROX WIN THE 2017 GEC CATALYST AWARDS

For too long companies have wanted to know more about their supply chains, only to be discouraged by the time and the resources needed to go it alone. That’s why we’re introducing a new kind of social network for brands and manufacturers within an industry to map their shared supply chains and collect data every step of the way – data essential to establishing benchmarks for social and environmental impact. We’re thrilled that the Green Electronics Council selected our Supply Chain Communities for this year’s Catalyzing Disruptive Innovation award at CES Asia, and look forward to working with the industry to advance visibility and sustainability throughout the global electronics supply chain.

From the Green Electronics Council's press release:

SHANGHAI, CHINA – June 8, 2017 – The Green Electronics Council (GEC) announced at CES Asia today that Xerox Corporation, a global document solutions, technologies and services corporation, and Sourcemap, Inc., the supply chain transparency company, won its 2017 GEC Catalyst Awards. GEC’s annual Catalyst Awards seek to inspire innovation in the design, manufacture and use of electronics to advance global sustainability.
GEC’s Catalyst Awards honor sustainability achievements in two categories. The “Catalyzing Impact at Scale” award recognizes the large-scale impact leading corporations can have when changing the design, manufacture and intended use of their products. GEC’s “Catalyzing Disruptive Innovation” award recognizes cutting-edge technologies that raise sustainability to a whole new level.
Xerox won the Catalyzing Impact at Scale Award for a global reverse supply-chain initiative that methodically analyzes ROI for remanufacture, refurbish, parts reuse, recycle, and broker sales. Sourcemap won the Catalyzing Disruptive Innovation Award for its supply-chain transparency community that ensures the sustainability of supply chains down to the raw material.
“The negative environmental and social impacts resulting from complex global supply chains are among the greatest challenges currently facing the IT industry,” said Nancy Gillis, CEO of the Green Electronics Council. “We congratulate this year’s Winners, Honorees, and Finalists for demonstrating ways to address this challenge and exhibiting sustainable supply chain leadership and innovation.”
An independent, expert Judging Committee selected the top Catalyst Award Winners and, for the first time, recognized three special Honorees. LG Electronics and Cisco Systems were each named “Catalyzing Impact at Scale” Honorees. A collaboration between Vodafone and Good World Solutions was selected as a “Catalyzing Disruptive Innovation” Honoree.
Xerox has long been recognized as an industry leader in end-of-life management, and over the past few years Xerox has optimized the global reverse logistics system to further enable a sustainable supply chain. The optimization utilizes a centralized control system, which calculates the value associated with sending a product through one of five potential processes, then selects the process that will create the greatest value. Through this optimized system and process improvements, Xerox has realized millions of dollars in cost benefit, achieved significant greenhouse gas savings and enabled numerous social sustainability benefits.
Sourcemap’s Supply Chain Transparency Community is a powerful new approach to providing industry-wide assurance of sustainability and compliance across the extended supply chain. It works through a shared repository of pre-competitive information on suppliers’ social and environmental performance fed by real-time data from a supplier social network, independently verified by machine learning algorithms and independent auditors. For the first time brands can achieve continuous supply chain assurance at low cost, while suppliers benefit from visibility and actionable benchmarks to help achieve best-in-class performance.
The five Finalists for the 2017 GEC Catalyst Awards were the Chinese Environmental United Certification CenterKaiser PermanentePacific Gas and Electric Companytoxnot PBC, and Umicore.
The Judging Committee for the 2017 Catalyst Awards included Walter Alcorn, Vice President, Environmental Affairs and Industry Sustainability at the Consumer Technology Association; Michael Massetti, Executive Partner, Supply Chain at Gartner; Karen Pollard, Environmental Protection Specialist at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Steve Rochlin, Americas Co-Manager at the Global E-Sustainability Initiative; Joel Sutherland, President of Envoy Inc.; and Matthew Swibel, Director, Corporate Sustainability at Lockheed Martin Corporation.
GEC announced the winners at CES Asia in Shanghai, China as an official program partner of the Consumer Technology Association (CTA). Past GEC Catalyst Awards winners include PuzzlePhone, AMD, and Dell, Inc.
The 2018 Catalyst Awards theme will be announced later this year.

Want to learn more about Sourcemap's Industry Communities? Get in touch

Open Sourcemap at 6 Months: 1,980 Transparent Supply Chains, 1,881 New Users, 47 GROUNDBREAKING Brands

In just six months since we launched our newest transparency platform, almost 1,900 users have registered - including brands such as Hershey's, Vivienne Westwood, Fairphone, Thread, and dozens more. Here are some of your favorites:

Source NY: the New York State Craft Beverage Community

Your beer may be locally brewed, but are the hops and barley? Find out with Source NY - the first supply chain community for craft beverage producers.

A social enterprise is a business for which social and environmental impact is core - and Thread is a great example. Browse the map above to find out how hundreds of trash collectors supplement their income to provide post-consumer recycled content for Timberland's boots.

The first Official account on Open Sourcemap is still one of the best: find out where Fairphone sources nearly 300 components and raw materials for its one-of-a-kind sustainable smartphone.

 

See How Vivienne Westwood, Karen Walker, Mimco and sass & bide support artisans in East AFrica: introducing Ethical Fashion Initiative + Sourcemap

We're proud to have been selected by the Ethical Fashion Initiative (Motto: Not Charity - Just Work) as the software for RISEmap: an online traceability platform highlighting the brands who support artisans in Kenya, Uganda, and Ethiopia through their supply chains. Accessible through QR codes on product hangtags and the EFI website itself, RISEmap highlights stories of unique crafts that sustain communities and supply unique products to globally recognized brands. Find out more by visiting the RISEmaps below:

Visit the RISE reports page to learn more about the work of the Ethical Fashion Initiative

Want to know where products come from? Introducing Open Sourcemap

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People have a right to know where things come from. That's why we're launching a brand new platform for supply chain transparency: Open Sourcemap. It's full of exciting new features, including Official accounts - for radically transparent brands - and the fastest, most powerful interface for supply chain mapping. So get in there, make some supply chain maps, ask your friends and colleagues to do the same, and soon there will be an even bigger directory of supply chains available to the public.

Here are some of the exciting new features of Open Sourcemap:

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Improved User Interface

You can map supply chains faster and more easily than ever before thanks to a completely re-built user interface for web and mobile.

Official accounts

Radically transparent companies can stand out with an 'Official' designation, which includes the ability to add Instagram, a logo and header image. Apply for an official account here.

WHO - WHAT - WHERE

We're making it easy for visitors to search for your company (WHO), the products you make (WHAT) and your location (WHERE) through a new map creation workflow.  

Related supply chains

Look for a filmstrip at the bottom of any supply chain page - it shows the related companies and products you might be interested in checking out.

Google Places integration

Every time you enter an address, we make sure it's as accurate as possible by matching it against Google's massive places database.

Photos and videos

Upload as many full-size images as you want to and embed youtube videos to tell the story of a particular supplier, product or process. The images will be shown full-size in a light-box when visitors click on them.