Find out EXACTLY where the 400+ parts of your smartphone come from [Fairphone 2 Sourcemap]

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Fairphone was the first brand to register for an official account on Open Sourcemap - and they did it to publish the supply chain of the next-generation ethically sourced Fairphone 2. It's no easy feat considering they were able to trace the phone down to the raw materials' country of origins and the mines themselves in some cases. See the embedded map below or visit it directly on the Fairphone website. 

It's EOY: Are you on track to meet sustainability targets? [LEARNINGS FROM INDUSTRY]

More and more companies are making public commitments to sustainability issues ranging from deforestation and water to diversity and gender parity. What's the best way to ensure they're going to be met? Tracking sustainability goals depends on accurate information collected across the supply chain. Measuring carbon footprint, water and energy use means measuring your own facilities and your suppliers'. Evaluating impact to watersheds and forests means comparing your data against best available statistics from organizations such as the World Resources Institute and the Global Forest Watch. And ensuring goals for equitable hiring means a direct line to Human Resources. 

Here are some of the lessons we've learned from implementing company-wide sustainability goal-tracking platforms:

  • Quantify your targets: It's much harder to measure progress against qualitative goals like "more recycled content" or "aiming for equity" than it is against hard numbers like "100% certified" and "25% reduction in carbon footprint". 

  • Set up a verification and feedback workflow: Collecting data is only the beginning of measuring sustainability; in order to use the information it has to be validated. Take this as an opportunity to engage with respondents to fill gaps in data, correct errors, and ensure alignment inside and outside the organization.

  • Automation is key: Wherever possible, connect data feeds from existing platforms so that progress can be measured consistently and in real time. For example, a purchasing data feed can be used to measure product carbon footprint, and connected water meters can give you real-time insight into water conservation.

  • Do it in the cloud: Collecting information from all of the suppliers, auditors, and internal departments means setting up a secure platform for data collection across the supply chain - just like mySourcemap.

  • Focus on insights: Once you start to measure progress against targets, the results might be surprising. Use those surprises to find out what went wrong and where strategies need to shift to focus resources on the areas that need it most.

Interested in finding out more? Sourcemap offers a full-featured sustainability monitoring platform that can incorporate feeds from any existing databases. Learn more by requesting a demo.

How will global warming affect your supply chain? Introducing climate change heat maps (and rain maps)

Climate Change Heat Maps on Sourcemap the Supply Chain Mapping Software

Global warming is expected to have widespread impact on agriculture and our ability to feed ourselves. But making sense of the risk is difficult: climate change will affectΩ regions in different ways, and combinations of temperature and precipitation will impact specific crops in ways that are sometimes counterintuitive. Combining data from the WRI and the Climate Change Knowledge Portal, our software is helping brands find out which issues are going to become relevant in the short term. Based on the industry, the product, and the region, those issues become benchmarks that help to prioritize action for maximum impact.

The image above shows two heat maps: anticipated climate and precipitation change by 2100. As an example, some parts of the continental US can expect warming of 5°C (9°F), and others can expect 200mm (8") more annual rainfall by 2100. The data from the layers visible above is combined with industry-specific water risks, groundwater health, and other issues (including protected areas) to derive an overall risk for specific farms and for brands as a whole.  Want to learn more? Click below for a demo:

Want to know where products come from? Introducing Open Sourcemap

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People have a right to know where things come from. That's why we're launching a brand new platform for supply chain transparency: Open Sourcemap. It's full of exciting new features, including Official accounts - for radically transparent brands - and the fastest, most powerful interface for supply chain mapping. So get in there, make some supply chain maps, ask your friends and colleagues to do the same, and soon there will be an even bigger directory of supply chains available to the public.

Here are some of the exciting new features of Open Sourcemap:

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Improved User Interface

You can map supply chains faster and more easily than ever before thanks to a completely re-built user interface for web and mobile.

Official accounts

Radically transparent companies can stand out with an 'Official' designation, which includes the ability to add Instagram, a logo and header image. Apply for an official account here.

WHO - WHAT - WHERE

We're making it easy for visitors to search for your company (WHO), the products you make (WHAT) and your location (WHERE) through a new map creation workflow.  

Related supply chains

Look for a filmstrip at the bottom of any supply chain page - it shows the related companies and products you might be interested in checking out.

Google Places integration

Every time you enter an address, we make sure it's as accurate as possible by matching it against Google's massive places database.

Photos and videos

Upload as many full-size images as you want to and embed youtube videos to tell the story of a particular supplier, product or process. The images will be shown full-size in a light-box when visitors click on them.

 

 

Sourcemap Selected as Palm Oil Supply Chain Innovator [SAWIT 2016]

Palm oil plantation

Palm oil plantation

In Jakarta November 17-18? Join us as part of the Smallholders Advancing with Innovation and Technology (SAWIT) Challenge. We'll be demonstrating our platform for smallholder sustainability, which combines smartphone field monitoring and cloud-based traceability with satellite heat maps to ensure deforestation-free agriculture. Learn more about our technology for traceability to combat deforestation here, and the SAWIT challenge here

Find Out How Thirsty Your Supply Chain Is with Sourcemap + the WRI Water Risk Atlas

Overall water risk 2020-2040 on WRI Aqueduct 2.1 

Overall water risk 2020-2040 on WRI Aqueduct 2.1 

The world has only so much fresh water - and it's not evenly distributed. The newest version of the World Resource Institute's Water Risk Atlas provides detailed statistics on water risk for every industry, under present conditions and in light of predicted climate change. That means industries who map their supply chains can quickly assess where - and when - to implement water conservation. Above you can see the spread of water scarcity in the Middle East; below the scores for a few hundred textile mills in South and East Asia. Want to learn more? Contact us for a demo.

Overall water risk scores overlaid on a supplier map on Sourcemap

Overall water risk scores overlaid on a supplier map on Sourcemap